Pax Britannica: The Climax of an Empire

Pax Britannica: The Climax of an Empire
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  • Label: NAXOS AUDIO BOOKS, 2011
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-13: 9781843794691
  • Bestellnummer: 4925560
  • Altersfreigabe: FSK ab 0 freigegeben - - -
  • Spielzeit: 25:00 Min.
  • Label: Naxos Audiobooks
  • FSK ab 0 freigegeben
  • Bestellnummer: 4925560
  • Erscheinungstermin: 15.7.2011

  • Achtung: Artikel ist nicht in deutscher Sprache!

Weitere Ausgaben von Pax Britannica: The Climax of an Empire

  • Tracklisting

Disk 1 von 13

  1. 1 Introduction by Jan Morris
  2. 2 Pax Britannica ? The British Empire 1897
  3. 3 Chapter 1: The Heirs of Rome
  4. 4 2: The crowds outside waited in proud excitement
  5. 5 3: Many and varied energies had swept the British
  6. 6 Among the better-informed
  7. 7 "4: Within two minutes, we are told"
  8. 8 5: More gratifying still was the tribute of the Empire itself.
  9. 9 6: The procession itself was a superb display
  10. 10 7: Everybody agreed it was a great success.
  11. 11 Chapter 2: Palm and Pine
  12. 12 2: Outside this heterogeneous mass there shone
  13. 13 3: All this the British people surveyed
  14. 14 4: So they were motley origins
  15. 15 "5: Never since the world began, Seeley had written"
  16. 16 6: So it looked to the British.
  17. 17 Chapter 3: Life-lines
  18. 18 2: A favourite map of the time was the kind that showed
  19. 19 "3: Elaborate systems of supply, defence and communication"

Disk 2 von 13

  1. 1 The British held key ports and maritime fortresses
  2. 2 4: Backwards and forwards along the imperial shipping lanes
  3. 3 5: The British had invented submarine cables
  4. 4 "6: All this vast expertise, of ships and mails"
  5. 5 Chapter 4: Migrations
  6. 6 2: Emigration to the Empire was officially popular.
  7. 7 3: If the Empire dispersed the British
  8. 8 4: As for the flora and fauna
  9. 9 5: It multiplied so fast that its progeny became a plague
  10. 10 "6: Saddest of all, in their irrepressible impulse to control"
  11. 11 Chapter 5: Pioneers
  12. 12 2: It was a sign of the imperial times that Rhodesia
  13. 13 "3: As for us, said the Rhodesia Herald"
  14. 14 "4: The Company had been, it is true, under a cloud"
  15. 15 5: These were the homely pleasures of a frontier town
  16. 16 6: But far lower even than the vagrants in the social scale

Disk 3 von 13

  1. 1 7: Salisbury was scarcely a sentimental town.
  2. 2 Chapter 6: The Profit
  3. 3 2: In the 1890s this atavistic view of imperial profit
  4. 4 3: Trade was a steadier imperial impulse
  5. 5 The free ports of the Empire
  6. 6 4: It was a common belief among the late Victorians
  7. 7 5: Such was the profit-mechanism of Empire
  8. 8 6: So all these various instincts and impulses of profit
  9. 9 Chapter 7: The Glory
  10. 10 2: The Empire was at its zenith
  11. 11 "3: Dreams of private glory, too, forced the imperial play"
  12. 12 4: What incentives they were!
  13. 13 5: Many years before Dr. Livingstone had laid another trail
  14. 14 6: The evangelical mood was now past its prime
  15. 15 7: On a Governmental level
  16. 16 8: And there was one more stimulus to splendour
  17. 17 Chapter 8: Caste
  18. 18 The joke that niggers began at Calais was not entirely a joke.
  19. 19 3: But to be coloured was something else.
  20. 20 4: By the nineties the attitude had hardened.

Disk 4 von 13

  1. 1 In England those who believed the East could be
  2. 2 5: The immediate problems of race arose only
  3. 3 6: Yet this very class of Anglicized Asians and Africans
  4. 4 7: Among the settlers and planters of the tropical Empire
  5. 5 8: A vassal could qualify for respect
  6. 6 9: On the banks of the Hooghly River in Calcutta
  7. 7 "10: For it was not viciousness, nor even simply conceit"
  8. 8 11: Steevenss unspeakable conceit might speak
  9. 9 Chapter 9: Islanders
  10. 10 2: Like many another island fortress it had endured
  11. 11 3: It was a colony exceptional in its beauty
  12. 12 4: It was quite an elaborate little Government
  13. 13 5: A mile or so from Government House
  14. 14 "6: Often, when a merchant ship approached the entrance"
  15. 15 7: St. Lucias Diamond Jubilee accordingly
  16. 16 "8: But then a feu de joie, commented the Voice sourly"
  17. 17 9: Brigade-Surgeon Gouldsbury never returned to St. Lucia
  18. 18 Chapter 10: Imperial Order

Disk 5 von 13

  1. 1 2: The one immoveable thing about it was the Crown.
  2. 2 3: The Crown at the very summit
  3. 3 4: From the graceful little iron suspension bridge
  4. 4 5: It was an imperial maxim
  5. 5 6: Steeped in the traditions of the team spirit
  6. 6 7: Top jobs in the Empire sometimes went to grandees
  7. 7 8: The law was different.
  8. 8 "9: Loftily above it all, the supreme fount of imperial justice"
  9. 9 "10: Not the law as such, but the rule of law"
  10. 10 Chapter 11: Imperial Complexity
  11. 11 2: At one end were the great self-governing colonies
  12. 12 3: Nothing was uniform.
  13. 13 4: Consider the island of Ascension
  14. 14 5: Here are a few less spectacular anomalies of Empire.
  15. 15 6: And oddest of all the imperial phenomena was Egypt.
  16. 16 7: Paddling up the Nile with Oxford marmalade
  17. 17 8: It was all bits and pieces.
  18. 18 Chapter 12: Imperialists in General

Disk 6 von 13

  1. 1 "2: Nobody, of course, runs so true to type as that."
  2. 2 3: The aristocracy of Empire was the official class
  3. 3 4: Poor Anglo-Indians!
  4. 4 5: They walked dolorously to and fro under the glare
  5. 5 6: Among the white settlers everywhere
  6. 6 7: The maverick patrician escaped all this
  7. 7 Chapter 13: Imperialists in Particular
  8. 8 2: The age of the great explorers was almost over
  9. 9 3: There were only three British soldiers
  10. 10 The second soldier of the Empire was
  11. 11 4: Alone among the admirals of the imperial Navy
  12. 12 5: Of the proconsuls in the field of Empire that summer
  13. 13 6: Two politicians of very different stamp
  14. 14 Salisbury was a remote enigma to the British public.
  15. 15 7: The men Kipling called the doers were mostly unknown

Disk 7 von 13

  1. 1 Rhodes was first of all a money-maker.
  2. 2 8: There were other exceptional imperialists
  3. 3 Chapter 14: Proconsuls
  4. 4 2: Simla in 1897 was one of the most extraordinary places
  5. 5 3: In the morning Simla seemed different again
  6. 6 "4: Seven thousand feet up, eighty miles from a railway line"
  7. 7 5: The British Government in India was a despotism
  8. 8 6: So from top to bottom
  9. 9 7: But however original the young officers in the field
  10. 10 8: The Viceroy knew that his was a unique imperial trust.
  11. 11 9: It was a bad year in India
  12. 12 Chapter 15: Consolations
  13. 13 2: Sport was the first.
  14. 14 3: Drink came next ? food did not interest them half so much.
  15. 15 4: They liked their creature comforts

Disk 8 von 13

  1. 1 In Australia the clubs very early became strongholds
  2. 2 5: Throughout the length and breadth of the Empire
  3. 3 6: They had developed to a new pitch of finesse
  4. 4 7: They enjoyed themselves with tourism.
  5. 5 8: One easily detects pathos in these pleasures.
  6. 6 Chapter 16: Challenge and Responses
  7. 7 2: But one of the most enviable advantages
  8. 8 "3: For a century living dangerously, or alone"
  9. 9 4: Into the mystique of every British settlement
  10. 10 5: But there was to this great communal exploit
  11. 11 Chapter 17: Stones of Empire
  12. 12 2: Supreme in every imperial city stood the house of God
  13. 13 "3: Next to the house of God, the home of the Empire-builder."
  14. 14 4: Public buildings of the most august elaboration
  15. 15 5: One day in 1836 Colonel William Light
  16. 16 "6: The British, who generally neglected their waterfronts"
  17. 17 7: The Maharajah gave the order

Disk 9 von 13

  1. 1 The British had a genius for parks
  2. 2 8: The garden instinct of the English did not always survive
  3. 3 Chapter 18: Tribal Lays and Images
  4. 4 2: No English Delacroix arose
  5. 5 3: Few other professional painters made the Empire
  6. 6 4: Most of the statues in the British Empire
  7. 7 5: But they were mostly of the Queen.
  8. 8 "6: Marches and oratorios, fanfares and even ballets"
  9. 9 7: The difficulty about imperialism as a literary motif
  10. 10 8: Out of the frenzy three writers emerge
  11. 11 "Yet the third of our writers, a short-sighted journalist"
  12. 12 Nobody saw more clearly through the petty pretences
  13. 13 9: In literature as in art
  14. 14 Chapter 19: All by Steam!
  15. 15 2: The British Empire was a development agency
  16. 16 3: Some of the imperial works really were on the colossal scale.
  17. 17 4: But this was the railway age
  18. 18 5: There was no grand plan for the railways of the Empire.

Disk 10 von 13

  1. 1 In India especially
  2. 2 6: In the last three decades of the century
  3. 3 7: They were making a start with tropical medicine.
  4. 4 8: One gets the unfortunate impression
  5. 5 "9: The natives saw this millennium, and it worked."
  6. 6 Chapter 20: Freedmen
  7. 7 2: Canada was still a colony of the British Empire.
  8. 8 3: The imperial hegemony was tactfully exerted.
  9. 9 "4: Canada had become a nation, of a sort"
  10. 10 5: The first Europeans in Canada were the French
  11. 11 6: The British Canadians were loyal to the Crown
  12. 12 "7: An English Canadian, W.H. Drummond"
  13. 13 "8: They did not, for example, throw squibs at the Jubilee"
  14. 14 9: It was not a contented country.
  15. 15 Chapter 21: On Guard
  16. 16 2: The land forces of the Empire were drawn
  17. 17 3: The Army List of 1897 records only nine

Disk 11 von 13

  1. 1 4: This was not a promising formula for modern war
  2. 2 5: But also at the Queens command stood another army
  3. 3 6: It was in India that the martial heroism of Empire
  4. 4 7: No other imperial war had left memories so hallowed
  5. 5 8: Between them the two armies of the British Empire
  6. 6 Chapter 22: At Sea
  7. 7 2: The Royal Navy did not lack self-esteem.
  8. 8 3: These were the extravagances of a lost age
  9. 9 4: The social structure of the Navy
  10. 10 "5: British naval strategy, such as it was"
  11. 11 Chapter 23: Imperial Effects
  12. 12 "2: Let us ourselves, guide in hand, wander around London"
  13. 13 "3: And if, like every other visitor, we finally strolled"
  14. 14 4: The New Imperialism was too new
  15. 15 "5: Half without knowing it, the British had picked up"
  16. 16 6: In 1882 there appeared in the list of English cat breeds

Disk 12 von 13

  1. 1 7: A shifting population of colonials moved through London.
  2. 2 8: If the physical imprint of Empire was slight
  3. 3 9: The New Imperialism was potent politics.
  4. 4 10: But cause and effect were often muddled
  5. 5 11: So the foreigners first impression was right in a way.
  6. 6 Chapter 24: Overlords
  7. 7 2: Implanted in this melancholy setting were the Anglo-Irish
  8. 8 3: Many Anglo-Irish were understandably distressed
  9. 9 "4: The Cadogans stood, ex officio"
  10. 10 5: This queer regime remained undeterred
  11. 11 6: Much more permanent were the barracks
  12. 12 7: Of all the cities the British had created across the waters
  13. 13 8: Ireland was the only one of the Queens dominions
  14. 14 "9: Everything was orderly and peaceable,"
  15. 15 10: The Irish Times blushed.
  16. 16 11: The noblest cause? Treason or patriotism?
  17. 17 Chapter 25: Omens
  18. 18 2: If precedents were anything to go by
  19. 19 3: Would the barbarians one day take over?

Disk 13 von 13

  1. 1 But it was the sea that counted.
  2. 2 4: On Jubilee evening the Governor of Bombay
  3. 3 5: In Egypt almost nobody wanted the British to stay
  4. 4 6: Everything was under control
  5. 5 7: Was it all worth it?
  6. 6 8: But in that celebratory summer any weakening
  7. 7 9: It was not to be.
  8. 8 Chapter 26: The Song on Your Bugles Blown
  9. 9 2: Was it a Christian Empire?
  10. 10 3: Yet there was no rule to it.
  11. 11 4: A less involved imperial principle
  12. 12 "5: Plain Englishness, in those days, was a principle."
  13. 13 6: To many Britons this was not enough.
  14. 14 7: But if in some corners of the Empire
  15. 15 8: This was the saving flaw of British imperialism
  16. 16 Chapter 27: Finale
  17. 17 2: So their pride was understandable
  18. 18 3: The New Imperialism quickly subsided.